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Tool Box Talks:  ISRI News Letter
Thirty-Minute Break
This page will give you some tips from various sources.  One of our sources, ISRI, has some wonderful tool box talks they share in a weekly e-mail promoting the Health & Safety of Workers in the Scrap Recycling Industry.  We will share these with you from time to time.
Effective   July   1,   2013,   the   hours   of   service   regulations   will   require   that   if   more   than   8   consecutive hours   have   passed   since   the   last   off-duty   (or   sleeper-berth)   period   of   at   least   a   half   an   hour,   a   driver must take an off-duty break of at least 30 minutes before driving. For   example,   if   the   driver   started   driving   immediately   after   coming   on   duty,   he   or   she   could   drive   for   8 consecutive   hours,   take   a   half-hour   break,   and   then   drive   another   3   hours   for   a   total   of   11   hours.   In another   example,   this   driver   could   drive   for   3   hours,   take   a   half-hour   break,   and   then   drive   for   8 hours, for a total of 11 hours. Because   of   this   new   short   break   provision,   drivers   will   be   able   to   work   13.5   hours   in   a   14-hour   period (if   they   are   driving   after   the   8th   hour   on   duty).   The   driver   must   be   off   duty   for   at   least   a   half   hour. Meal breaks or any other off-duty time of at least 30 minutes qualifies as a break. This   time   does   count   against   the   14-hour   driving   window,   as   allowing   off-duty   time   to   extend   the   work day would allow drivers to drive long past he time when fatigue becomes extreme. For more information visit www.fmcsa.dot.gov Produced by the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries www.isri.org www.isrisafety.org Send comments or questions to: isrisafety@isri.org July 2, 2013
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Resources
NAICS Code: 562111 Solid Waste Collection Listed   below   are   the   standards   which   were   cited   by   Federal   OSHA    for   the   specified   NAICS   Code   during   the   period October    2013    through    September    2014.    Penalties    shown    reflect    current    rather    than    initial    amounts.    For    more information, see definitions .
Standard Citations Inspections Penalty Description Total 171 46 $246,676 All Standards cited for Solid Waste Collection 19101200 20 12 $6,360 Hazard Communication. 19100147 17 8 $48,760 The control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout). 19100134 16 7 $1,200 Respiratory Protection. 19100178 13 11 $18,220 Powered industrial trucks. 19100132 11 9 $19,098 General requirements. 5A0001 11 10 $35,005 OSH Act General Duty Paragraph 19100305 9 6 $5,300 Wiring methods, components, and equipment for general use. 19100303 7 6 $11,113 General requirements. 19100212 6 6 $12,840 General requirements for all machines. 19100215 6 3 $7,290 Abrasive wheel machinery. 19101030 6 2 $16,100 Bloodborne pathogens. 19100037 4 4 $3,850 Maintenance, safeguards, and operational features for exit routes. 19100141 4 3 $655 Sanitation. 19100253 4 3 $7,590 Oxygen-fuel gas welding and cutting. 19101025 4 1 $1,500 Lead. 19101027 4 1 $1,500 Cadmium 19100095 3 1 $5,000 Occupational noise exposure. 19100157 3 3 $0 Portable fire extinguishers. 19040004 2 2 $420 Recording criteria. 19100023 2 2 $6,720 Guarding floor and wall openings and holes. 19100146 2 2 $1,700 Permit-required confined spaces 19100151 2 2 $3,835 Medical services and first aid. 19100242 2 2 $2,066 Hand and portable powered tools and equipment, general. 19040029 1 1 $770 Forms. 19040032 1 1 $800 Annual summary. 19040039 1 1 $3,500 --- No Description Found --- 19040040 1 1 $440 --- No Description Found --- 19100022 1 1 $5,390 General requirements. 19100036 1 1 $3,600 Design and construction requirements for exit routes. 19100110 1 1 $3,240 Storage and handling of liquefied petroleum gases. 19100138 1 1 $500 Hand Protection. 19100219 1 1 $3,500 Mechanical power-transmission apparatus. 19100244 1 1 $1,875 Other portable tools and equipment. 19100304 1 1 $2,040 Wiring design and protection. 19100333 1 1 $4,900 Selection and use of work practices 19101020 1 1 $0 Access to employee exposure and medical records.
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The following were the top 10 most frequently cited standards by Federal OSHA in fiscal year 2014 (October 1, 2013 through September 30, 2014): 	1.	Fall protection, construction (29 CFR 1926.501) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page] 	2.	Hazard communication standard, general industry (29 CFR 1910.1200) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page] 	3.	Scaffolding, general requirements, construction (29 CFR 1926.451) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page] 	4.	Respiratory protection, general industry (29 CFR 1910.134) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page] 	5.	Powered industrial trucks, general industry (29 CFR 1910.178) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page] 	6.	Control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout), general industry (29 CFR 1910.147) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page] 	7.	Ladders, construction (29 CFR 1926.1053) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page] 	8.	Electrical, wiring methods, components and equipment, general industry (29 CFR 1910.305) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page] 	9.	Machinery and Machine Guarding, general requirements (29 CFR 1910.212) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page] 	10.	Electrical systems design, general requirements, general industry (29 CFR 1910.303) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]  Source: https://www.osha.gov/oshstats/commonstats.html      Top 10 OSHA Violations for 2014
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Terms of Use  |  Privacy Policy  |  Disclaimer  |  Legal  |  Careers Copyright © 2007 Industry Training LLC, dba Waste Industry Training All Rights Reserved
Tool Box Talks:  ISRI News Letter
Thirty-Minute Break
This page will give you some tips from various sources.  One of our sources, ISRI, has some wonderful tool box talks they share in a weekly e-mail promoting the Health & Safety of Workers in the Scrap Recycling Industry.  We will share these with you from time to time.
Effective   July   1,   2013,   the   hours   of   service   regulations will   require   that   if   more   than   8   consecutive   hours   have passed   since   the   last   off-duty   (or   sleeper-berth)   period of   at   least   a   half   an   hour,   a   driver   must   take   an   off-duty break of at least 30 minutes before driving. For   example,   if   the   driver   started   driving   immediately after    coming    on    duty,    he    or    she    could    drive    for    8 consecutive    hours,    take    a    half-hour    break,    and    then drive   another   3   hours   for   a   total   of   11   hours.   In   another example,   this   driver   could   drive   for   3   hours,   take   a   half- hour   break,   and   then   drive   for   8   hours,   for   a   total   of   11 hours. Because   of   this   new   short   break   provision,   drivers   will be   able   to   work   13.5   hours   in   a   14-hour   period   (if   they are   driving   after   the   8th   hour   on   duty).   The   driver   must be   off   duty   for   at   least   a   half   hour.   Meal   breaks   or   any other   off-duty   time   of   at   least   30   minutes   qualifies   as   a break. This    time    does    count    against    the    14-hour    driving window,   as   allowing   off-duty   time   to   extend   the   work   day would   allow   drivers   to   drive   long   past   he   time   when fatigue becomes extreme. For more information visit www.fmcsa.dot.gov Produced by the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries www.isri.org www.isrisafety.org Send comments or questions to: isrisafety@isri.org July 2, 2013
Tip
Resources
The following were the top 10 most frequently cited standards by Federal OSHA in fiscal year 2014 (October 1, 2013 through September 30, 2014): 	1.	Fall protection, construction (29 CFR 1926.501) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page] 	2.	Hazard communication standard, general industry (29 CFR 1910.1200) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page] 	3.	Scaffolding, general requirements, construction (29 CFR 1926.451) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page] 	4.	Respiratory protection, general industry (29 CFR 1910.134) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page] 	5.	Powered industrial trucks, general industry (29 CFR 1910.178) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page] 	6.	Control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout), general industry (29 CFR 1910.147) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page] 	7.	Ladders, construction (29 CFR 1926.1053) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page] 	8.	Electrical, wiring methods, components and equipment, general industry (29 CFR 1910.305) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page] 	9.	Machinery and Machine Guarding, general requirements (29 CFR 1910.212) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page] 	10.	Electrical systems design, general requirements, general industry (29 CFR 1910.303) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]  Source: https://www.osha.gov/oshstats/commonstats.html      Top 10 OSHA Violations for 2014
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